The Basics of MySQL Security

The Basics of MySQL Security

If you have ever built a website, chances are you took care of security. Securing web applications does have its own caveats though – did you take care of the security of the database? In this post we will look at the options that can make MySQL perform at the very best of its ability security-wise. Keep in mind that this is not a very comprehensive guide (certain topics such as backup security etc. will not be touched) and some…

Read More Read More

Build Stuff 2019 Retrospective

Build Stuff 2019 Retrospective

It’s November. For some developers it’s just an ordinary month – for some of them it means maintenance of projects, for some – building something cool on their own. Some of them visit Build Stuff. A lot of them, actually – this year Build Stuff has had around 1,400 attendees. Build Stuff 2019 Build Stuff is an annual conference for developers being organized in Lithuania. Conference theme for this year – Programming Jungle. As usual, the conference started off with…

Read More Read More

Cleaning a mechanical keyboard: Corsair Vengeance K70

Cleaning a mechanical keyboard: Corsair Vengeance K70

You noticed your keyboard has dirt, some keys are stuck, some keys are not registering properly …or maybe you just spilled some coffee on your keyboard. What do you do now? The answer is plain and simple: clean it. Here’s how to clean a Corsair Vengeance K70. The Corsair Vengeance K70 comes with Cherry MX Red key switches, ten contoured buttons for gaming, anti-ghosting, adjustable back-lighting, multimedia controls and even a detachable wrist rest. For those of you not familliar…

Read More Read More

WordPress Malware: WP-VCD

WordPress Malware: WP-VCD

Using nulled WordPress themes and plugins is bad. Why? Because sometimes (well, most of the time) nulled plugins or themes contain malicious code that looks something like this: That’s wp-vcd.php. When a WordPress website is infected with this piece of malware, the infected file resides in the “wp-includes” directory and every time a page on a WordPress website is accessed overwrites the functions.php file with malicious code that looks like this: Removing the code doesn’t do any good – as…

Read More Read More

Filtering user input in web applications: the basics

Filtering user input in web applications: the basics

SQL Injection. Cross-Site Scripting. These are just two of web application security flaws that can be prevented by effectively filtering user input. Web developers can filter user-supplied input in two ways – either by utilizing white-list or black-list input validation. Each method of input sanitization has their own pros and cons, so I will go through each of them individually. Black-list input sanitization Black-list input validation is one of the most common ways user-supplied input can be validated. The way…

Read More Read More

Build Stuff 2018 Retrospective

Build Stuff 2018 Retrospective

I do not usually write retrospectives on conferences I have attended, but this was something else altogether. What was it? This conference was a big one. And by saying big one, I mean it: In three days, we saw 1,300 attendees, 76 speakers, 6 keynotes and 80 sessions ranging from artificial intelligence to burnout in IT – Build Stuff is the largest software development event in the Baltics! The conference started off on Wednesday with a welcome talk followed by…

Read More Read More

Here’s how I prepare for conferences

Here’s how I prepare for conferences

Public speaking can be enormously empowering and fulfilling. I have spoken at quite a few international conferences – I always reflect on what I’ve done right and what’s been done wrong after the conference, but not once have I covered how exactly do I prepare for them. I do not overload the slides with content Overloading slides with content is one of the top no-nos when doing any form of presentation. The audience either listens to the speaker or reads…

Read More Read More

CSRF Tokens? What Tokens?

CSRF Tokens? What Tokens?

In a previous blog post where I covered Cross-Site Request Forgery and what potential impacts and consequences such an attack may have, I wrote that a popular way to prevent such an attack from unfolding is to generate tokens. In that blog post, I noted that when a website generates tokens, a CSRF attack might be stopped. One thing I did not cover though is that whether the attack will be stopped or not depends on how the tokens are implemented. Confused?…

Read More Read More

Bank-grade Security or Why Blocking Password Pasting is not a Good Security Strategy

Bank-grade Security or Why Blocking Password Pasting is not a Good Security Strategy

Your friend creates a website. You are curious and you ask him: “is it secure?”, which, in your mind, probably means “did you secure your website to the best of your abilities?” and your friend replies: “Yes, it has bank-grade security”. Oh, “bank grade security”, damn! That means it’s very secure! Before you intervene, I am by no ways stating that banking websites are insecure – I am interested in how banks and other financial institutions deal with passwords though….

Read More Read More

Carriage Return Line Feed (CRLF) Injection Explained

Carriage Return Line Feed (CRLF) Injection Explained

How does a server know when a new header begins and the old one ends or when a line is terminated? Simple. In order to note the termination of a line, \r\n or %0D%0A characters are used. These characters refer to Carriage Return (\r) Line Feed (\n). The characters can (and are) used in HTTP responses. To note the end of a line, they can also be used in files. Is it dangerous? A Carriage Return Line Feed (CRLF) Injection vulnerability occurs…

Read More Read More